Sociology

Quality and Complete project materials for all departments

WHERE HAVE ALL THE (WHITE AND HISPANIC) INMATES GONE COMPARING THE RACIAL COMPOSITION OF PRIVATE AND PUBLIC ADULT CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES

Abstract

Abstract: A great deal of research has documented racial disparities in imprisonment rates in the United States, but little work has been done to understand the process by which inmates are assigned to individual correctional facilities. This article extends research on racial disparities in imprisonment rates to consider racial disparities in inmate populations across prisons. Specifically, it examines the racial pattern of inmate placement in privately operated and publicly operated correctional facilities. Analysis of American adult correctional facilities reveals that, in 2005, white inmates were significantly underrepresented (and Hispanic inmates overrepresented) in private correctional facilities relative to public ones. Results from multilevel models show that being privately operated (as opposed to publicly operated) decreased the white share of a facility's population by more than eight percentage points and increased the Hispanic share of a facility's population by nearly two percentage points, net of facility- and state-level controls. These findings raise legal questions about equal protection of inmates and economic questions about the reliance of private correctional firms on Hispanic inmates.

Material Code

PBM_lqqy9

Reference

Andrews, D. A., Bonta, J., & Wormith, J. S. (2006). The Recent Past and Near Future of Risk and/or Need Assessment. Crime & Delinquency, 52(1), 7–27. Arizona Department of Corrections. (n.d.). Profile Classification Information. Retrieved July 26, 2013, from http://www.azcorrections.gov/inmate_datasearch/info/pclass.htm Armstrong, G. S., & MacKenzie, D. L. (2003). Private Versus Public Juvenile Correctional Facilities: Do Differences in Environmental Quality Exist? Crime & Delinquency, 49(4), 542–563. Austin, J., & Coventry, G. (2001). Emerging Issues on Privatized Prisons. Bureau of Justice Assistance Monograph (Vol. NCJ 181249). Washington, D.C.: Bureau of Justice Assistance. Austin, J., & Hardyman, P. L. (2004). Objective Prison Classification: A Guide for Correctional Agencies. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Corrections. Bales, W. D., Bedard, L. E., Quinn, S. T., Ensley, D. T., & Holley, G. P. (2005). Recidivism of Public and Private State Prison Inmates in Florida. Criminology & Public Policy, 4(1), 57–82. Beckett, K., Nyrop, K., & Pfingst, L. (2006). Race, Drugs, And Policing: Understanding Disparities In Drug Delivery Arrests. Criminology, 44(1), 105–137. Berk, R. A., Ladd, H., Graziano, H., & Baek, J.-H. (2003). A Randomized Experiment Testing Inmate Classification Systems. Criminology & Public Policy, 2(2), 215–242. Blakely, C. R., & Bumphus, V. W. (2004). Private and Public Sector Prisons--A Comparison of Select Characteristics. Federal Probation, 68(1), 27–31.

Quality Material By Project Basket

Price

₦3,000

Get Complete Material Quick Download

 

Related Materials

Fetching comments. Please wait...